Follow the Data

A data driven blog

Hadley Wickham lecture: ggvis, tidyr, dplyr and much more

Another week, another great meetup. This time, the very prolific Hadley Wickham visited the Stockholm R useR group and talked for about an hour about his new projects.

Perhaps some background is in order. Hadleys PhD thesis (free pdf here) is a very inspiring tour of different aspects of practical data analysis issues, such as reshaping data into a “tidy” for that is easy to work with (he developed the R reshape package for this), visualizing clustering and classification problems (see his classifly, clusterfly, and meifly packages) and creating a consistent language for describing plots and graphics (which resulted in the influential ggplot2 package). He has also made the plyr package as a more consistent version of the various “apply” functions in R. I learned a lot from this thesis.

Today, Hadley talked about several new packages that he has been developing to further improve on his earlier toolkit. He said that in general, his packages become simpler and simpler as he re-defines the basic operations needed for data analysis.

  • The newest one (“I wrote it about four days ago”, Hadley said) is called tidyr (it’s not yet on CRAN but can be installed from GitHub) and provides functions for getting data into the “tidy” format mentioned above. While reshape had the melt and cast commands, tidyr has gather, separate, and spread.
  • dplyr – the “next iteration of plyr”, which is faster and focuses on data frames. It uses commands like select, filter, mutate, summarize, arrange.
  • ggvis – a “dynamic version of ggplot2” which is designed for responsive dynamic graphics, streaming visualization and meant for the web. This looked really nice. For example, you can easily add sliders to a plot so you can change the parameters and watch how the plot changes in real time. ggvis is built on Shiny but provides easier ways to make the plots. You can even embed dynamic ggvis plots in R markdown documents with knitR so that the resulting report can contain sliders and other things. This is obviously not possible with PDFs though. ggvis will be released on CRAN “in a week or so”.

Hadley also highlighted the magrittr package which implements a pipe operator for R (Magritte/pipe … get it? (groan)) The pipe looks like %>% and at first blush it may not look like a big deal, but Hadley made a convincing case that using the pipe together with (for example) dplyr results in code that is much easier to read, write and debug.

Hadley is writing a book, Advanced R (wiki version here), which he said has taught him a lot about the inner workings of R. He mentioned Rcpp as an excellent way to write C++ code and embed it in R packages. The bigvis package was mentioned as a “proof of concept” of how one might visualize big data sets (where the number of data points is larger than the number of pixels on the screen, so it is physically impossible to plot everything and summarization is necessary.)

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